“Wieliczka” Salt Mine.

Address:
Daniłowicza 10, 32-020 Wieliczka
E-Mail:
turystyka@kopalnia.p>
WWW:
www.kopalnia.pl
Opening hours:

April – October:7:30 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.

November – March: 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Except:

1 January

Easter Sunday, (Holy Saturday to 2:30 p.m.)

1 November

24, 25 December (31 December only from 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.)

Description

Wieliczka Salt Mine is the only mining establishment in the world active continuously since the Middle Ages, and one of the most famous of Poland’s tourist attractions.

In 1978 the mine was entered into UNESCO’s First World List of Cultural and Natural Heritage.

The miners have been creating the mine for over seven centuries, by extracting rock salt from its deposits. The result of their work under the city of Wieliczka is a labyrinth of underground tunnels on nine levels, between 64 and 327 metres deep. The mine is made up of approximately 3 thousand chambers connected with tunnels with a total length of 300 kilometres. The history of Wieliczka reflects the development of mining techniques, formation of a work organisation and management system, the implementation of legal regulations in industry, and a lesson of patriotism and the love of liberty.

Open to the public is a section of the mine which includes the mining works most precious from the historical and sightseeing points of view – the Tourist Route. This underground route, comprising 20 chambers, is visited by over a million tourists every year. The route is approximately 3 kilometres long, and sprawls from level I (64 metres deep) to level III (135 metres deep). It is a particularly historic part of the mine, with mining works bearing the marks of old techniques of salt extraction. Venturing into the Wieliczka mine one can observe what the work and life of the old miners looked like, and also how the methods of mining salt and mining security measures have evolved since the 17th century. While sightseeing one can find out about old mining tools and equipment used for transporting salt, such as the treadmills and wooden carts, the socalled “Hungarian dogs”.

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