Kupa Synagogue

Address:
ul. Warszauera 8, Kraków

Description

The synagogue was built in 1740s and its construction was funded by the Qahal (mi-kupat ha-kahal), which is why its current name is Kupa. In the 2nd half of the 19th century, due to the construction of Miodowa Street, a garden was created between the street and the northern façade of the synagogue. Soon after, a one-storied outbuilding was erected, containing health offices, as well as a porch leading to the women's gallery. At the end of the 19th century, the synagogue was expanded by adding a brick house, which adjoined the building from the east. In the interwar period, a set of conservation works were conducted in the synagogue and on its premises. New murals were created in the interior.

The synagogue was built in 1740s and its construction was funded by the Qahal (mi-kupat ha-kahal), which is why its current name is Kupa. In the 2nd half of the 19th century, due to the construction of Miodowa Street, a garden was created between the street and the northern façade of the synagogue. Soon after, a one-storied outbuilding was erected, containing health offices, as well as a porch leading to the women's gallery. At the end of the 19th century, the synagogue was expanded by adding a brick house, which adjoined the building from the east. In the interwar period, a set of conservation works were conducted in the synagogue and on its premises. New murals were created in the interior.

The facility was surrounded by a decorative fence. During the German occupation in the years 1939-45, the synagogue was severely damaged. The bimah and the platform with the stairs and hazzan's pulpit in front of the ark were completely ruined. Its movable artistic furnishings were also lost forever. For several years after World War II, the synagogue held prayer meetings. It also fulfilled other functions. In the years 1946-47, it housed a matzo production plant. One of its halls contained a ritual poultry slaughterhouse, which operated until 1985, i.e. until the death of the butcher, Abraham Lesman. The north-western outbuilding accommodated Jewish families that came here from the USSR in 1945. In the years 1956-1991, the synagogue was used by a collective farm. Currently, it is undergoing renovation and awaits appointment of a new function.

Translation: Summa Linguae SA

Date: 2013-01-31 Show ticket
News author: PAWEŁ KRAWCZYK
News Publisher: Redakcja MPI
Tags: city, tourism
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